California Electricity Rates

See how California electricity rates stack up to other states.

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California Electricity Rates
Thad Warren By Thad Warren
USA avg. Electricity Rate

16.1¢

/kWh

California Electricity Rate

31.23¢

/kWh

Average California Electric Rates

Last updated May 2024

California ranks 50th in average electricity rates in the United States based on the average rates for all sectors from the Energy Information Administration.

Here's how the individual sectors of California's energy market stack up.

  • The average California residential electricity rate is 31.23 ¢/kWh (93% higher than the national average).
  • The average California commercial electricity rate is 23.61 ¢/kWh (84% higher than the national average).

Energy rate data sourced from the Energy Information Administration.

California Electricity Generation by Energy Source

Source
Percentage of Total
Renewable
48%
Non-Renewable
52%

California Electricity Rates versus other States:

Residential rates:

State
Current Month
Previous Month
California
31.23¢
29.49¢
North Dakota
10.5¢
9.88¢
Nebraska
10.72¢
9.85¢
Utah
10.99¢
10.85¢
Louisiana
11.25¢
10.82¢
Idaho
11.26¢
10.79¢
Oklahoma
11.3¢
11.16¢
Washington
11.4¢
11.09¢
Missouri
11.43¢
10.82¢
Wyoming
11.47¢
10.86¢
South Dakota
11.79¢
11.18¢
Arkansas
11.89¢
11.24¢
Montana
11.96¢
11.98¢
Tennessee
11.98¢
12.05¢
Iowa
12.15¢
11.85¢
Kentucky
12.48¢
12.27¢
Georgia
12.95¢
12.34¢
Mississippi
13.19¢
12.72¢
Kansas
13.74¢
13.04¢
Virginia
13.97¢
13.5¢
West Virginia
13.98¢
13.64¢
Indiana
14.11¢
13.75¢
New Mexico
14.14¢
13.76¢
South Carolina
14.21¢
13.54¢
Oregon
14.23¢
13.84¢
Texas
14.31¢
14.25¢
Minnesota
14.36¢
14.04¢
Arizona
14.46¢
14.11¢
Colorado
14.47¢
14.26¢
Alabama
14.98¢
14.4¢
North Carolina
15.1¢
13.07¢
Florida
15.28¢
14.79¢
Illinois
15.72¢
14.93¢
Delaware
15.73¢
15.53¢
Ohio
15.77¢
15.58¢
Nevada
16.69¢
16.38¢
Wisconsin
16.93¢
16.46¢
Pennsylvania
17.02¢
17.39¢
District of Columbia
17.1¢
16.83¢
Maryland
17.6¢
17.48¢
New Jersey
17.69¢
17.9¢
Michigan
18.57¢
18.34¢
Vermont
21.22¢
20.98¢
Alaska
22.88¢
23.78¢
New Hampshire
23.76¢
25.07¢
New York
24.23¢
23.44¢
Maine
24.95¢
25.89¢
Massachusetts
29.25¢
28.34¢
Connecticut
29.52¢
27.4¢
Rhode Island
30.97¢
31.22¢
Hawaii
43.93¢
44.28¢

Business rates:

State
Current Month
Previous Month
California
23.61¢
22.93¢
North Dakota
7.95¢
7.8¢
Utah
8.11¢
8.04¢
Oklahoma
8.19¢
9.53¢
Texas
8.67¢
9.02¢
Virginia
9.04¢
9.62¢
Idaho
9.14¢
8.64¢
Nebraska
9.22¢
8.94¢
Missouri
9.33¢
8.82¢
Iowa
9.46¢
9.73¢
Wyoming
9.67¢
9.52¢
South Dakota
10.08¢
9.71¢
New Mexico
10.5¢
10.54¢
Arkansas
10.52¢
10.26¢
South Carolina
10.65¢
10.79¢
Louisiana
10.72¢
9.48¢
Washington
10.74¢
10.52¢
Colorado
11.02¢
10.84¢
Kansas
11.03¢
10.5¢
Georgia
11.03¢
11.96¢
Pennsylvania
11.15¢
10.84¢
Nevada
11.15¢
11.15¢
Ohio
11.2¢
10.51¢
North Carolina
11.36¢
10.27¢
Montana
11.46¢
11.62¢
Arizona
11.5¢
11.46¢
Oregon
11.59¢
11.2¢
Illinois
11.66¢
11.36¢
Minnesota
11.68¢
11.51¢
West Virginia
11.77¢
10.74¢
Tennessee
11.87¢
11.99¢
Kentucky
12.1¢
11.59¢
Delaware
12.13¢
11.88¢
Florida
12.17¢
11.83¢
Indiana
12.52¢
12.46¢
Mississippi
12.6¢
11.13¢
Wisconsin
12.63¢
12.39¢
Maryland
12.91¢
13.07¢
Alabama
13.58¢
13.66¢
Michigan
13.73¢
13.7¢
New Jersey
13.75¢
13.23¢
District of Columbia
17.58¢
17.19¢
Vermont
18.29¢
18.35¢
New York
18.58¢
18.07¢
Maine
18.92¢
19.34¢
New Hampshire
20.23¢
20.3¢
Connecticut
20.85¢
20.56¢
Rhode Island
20.9¢
21.2¢
Alaska
21.13¢
21.31¢
Massachusetts
21.37¢
21.32¢
Hawaii
40.82¢
42.2¢

California Electricity Rates: An Overview

California, the most populous state in the U.S., has a unique and complex electricity market. With its diverse geography, climate, and population centers, understanding the intricacies of California electricity rates requires a deep dive into its market history, generation, trends, and future outlook.

Market History

The roots of California's electric utility industry can be traced back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major utility companies, such as Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE), emerged as primary providers in their respective regions.

However, the most significant transformation came in the late 1990s with the state's attempt to deregulate its electricity market. While deregulation aimed to promote competition and lower rates, it led to the California energy crisis in 2000-2001. This crisis resulted in blackouts and significantly higher electricity rates. The aftermath led to a restructured market with greater state oversight.

Electricity Generation

California's electricity generation is a mix of renewable and non-renewable sources. Over the years, the state has been a leader in promoting green energy solutions:

Renewables: California has made significant strides in incorporating renewables into its energy mix. Solar and wind energy have become prominent contributors, supported by state mandates and incentives.

Natural Gas: Historically, natural gas-fired plants have been a major source of electricity generation in California, offering a reliable backup for renewable sources.

Hydropower: The state's vast mountain ranges offer ample opportunity for hydropower generation, though this can be seasonally variable depending on rainfall.

Nuclear: California's last remaining nuclear power plant, Diablo Canyon, is set to retire by 2025, marking a move away from nuclear energy in the state's energy portfolio.

Current Trends

  • Increasing Renewable Integration: In line with its ambitious renewable portfolio standard (RPS), California aims to have 60% of its electricity come from renewable sources by 2030, and 100% by 2045.
  • Rate Structures: Time-of-use (TOU) rates have been increasingly adopted, encouraging consumers to shift their electricity use to off-peak hours when rates are typically lower.
  • Electric Vehicles (EVs): As EV adoption rises in the state, there's a growing demand for electricity. This adds both a challenge and opportunity for grid management and rate design.

Outlook for the California Energy Market

The future of California's energy market is geared towards sustainability and resilience:

  • Infrastructure Modernization: With wildfires posing a risk to power infrastructure, utilities are investing in grid modernization and hardening.
  • Energy Storage: As renewables continue to grow, energy storage solutions like batteries will play a pivotal role in ensuring grid stability.
  • Decentralization: The push for microgrids and localized energy generation is likely to redefine the state's electricity landscape.

California's electricity rates and market dynamics are a reflection of its commitment to sustainability, its historical challenges, and its ambitious vision for the future. As the state continues to navigate its unique energy needs, consumers and stakeholders can expect to see continued innovation and change in the coming years.